Climate Finance Readiness Workshop

A training workshop on climate finance readiness was held in Maputo on 4-6 April 2016. This was organized by the Climate Change Unit (UMC) of the Ministry of Land, Environment and Rural Development (MITADER) and the World Bank to help improve and increase the availability of financing for climate relevant sectors. The workshop was attended by a large number of participants from the public and private sector, as well as development and civil society partners. The training materials can be downloaded below.

 

Enhancing the Climate Reslience of Africa's Infrastructure

Enhancing the Climate Reslience of Africa's Infrastructure: The Power and Water Sectors

This book evaluates the impacts of climate change on hydropower and irrigation expansion plans in Africa’s main river basins (Congo, Niger, Nile, Orange, Senegal, Volta, and Zambezi), as well as the effects on the electricity sector across four power pools (West, Eastern, Central, and Southern power pools). The book demonstrates that failure to integrate climate change in the planning and design of power and water infrastructure could entail, in the driest scenarios, signifi cant losses of hydropower revenues and increases in consumer expenditure for energy. In the wettest climate scenarios, business-as-usual infrastructure development could lead to substantial forgone revenues if the larger volume of precipitation is not used to expand the production of hydropower.

As long as a climate risk analysis is fully integrated in the project cycle, starting from the upstream planning stages at the national, river basin, regional, and power-pool levels, and in pre-feasibility studies of individual investments, climate risks can be significantly mitigated in a cost effective manner. Proper integration of climate change in infrastructure investment needs to properly address the challenge posed by the large and persistent uncertainty surrounding climate projections. However, while ignoring climate change entails serious risks of planning and designing infrastructure that is not suited for the climate of the future, there is also a risk of adapting to climate change in the wrong way, which could be as significant as the risk of incurring damages when not adapting. A wrong adaptation decision takes place, for example, when it is based on the expectation that the future will be drier, when in fact, it turns out to be wetter. The solution to this dilemma is to identify an adaptation strategy that balances the risk of inaction with the risk of wrong action.

Climate Change Adaptation and Resilience in Africa

The Network of African Science Academies (NASAC), representing independent scientific institutions across the continent, met in Yaounde, Cameroon, to discuss and document
expected impacts and formulate policy recommendations in the context of climate change projected for the 21st century. The key themes of concern and recommendations that emerged from these discussions are as follows:
• Africa is particularly sensitive to and facing the consequences of the impacts of climate change due to the level of existing vulnerabilities even though it has little contribution to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions;
• Projected impacts of climate change will exacerbate existing challenges, affecting the realisation of some of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs);
• There is urgent need for appropriate local and regional adaptive actions; and
• There will be severe additional costs if action is not taken now.

Future hydro generation in the Zambezi basin under the latest IPCC climate change projections

Several large hydro plants are already in operation on the Zambezi river in southern Africa,and there are plans for several more. However, climate change is a potential threat for the economic viability of these projects.

The study described here is based on an ensemble of the latest climate model projections to assess future energy generation at existing and new major hydro plants in the Zambezi basin.

Monitoring climate change action and impacts: the Mozambique National Climate Change Monitoring and Evaluation Framework

Since climate change can no longer be avoided, and projections indicate that its impacts in Mozambique will increase both in frequency and intensity, the National Strategy for Adaptation and Mitigation of Climate Change (ENAMMC) has identified key action areas and activities to reduce the severity of impacts. These include adaptation measures, reduction of climate risks, and opportunities for mitigation, as well as low carbon development and the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. An important policy requirement is for annual reporting to the Cabinet on implementation progress and impacts of the strategy.
For this reason, a national monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework has been developed which is fully integrated with government planning and budget systems.  This framework was approved by the government  in October 2014 as part of the Development of Policy and Operations (DPO) of the World Bank-supported project, and it provides the basis for national reporting on climate change responses to the Council of Ministers , to international conventions, and to international climate financing bodies.  

For this reason, a national monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework has been developed which is fully integrated with government planning and budget systems.   This framework was approved by the government  in October 2014 as part of the Development of Policy and Operations (DPO) of the World Bank-supported project, and it provides the basis for national reporting on climate change responses to the Council of Ministers , to international conventions, and to international climate financing bodies.  

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